Using LinkedIn to Find a Pool of Clients for Your Translation Services

LinkedIn is one of the most crucial social media tools for freelance translators who are looking to advance and broaden their clientele. LinkedIn is like your online curriculum vitae. It has the capacity to do a lot more than that. It is your online footprint that serves to brand your reputation, and it is the same platform that you can use to exhibit the value you can bring to clients. There are so many networking opportunities and clients that are present every day on LinkedIn, and they are freely accessible.

I want to share tips on how to maximize your LinkedIn experience.

Update Your Profile

Fill up your contact information, education history, professional experience and the other vital fields.  Include a professional – looking profile picture. It should be a headshot with a friendly smile, Avoid using your company logo in place of a portrait. Potential clients want to visualize the person behind the translation business.

Come up with a very catchy title for your LinkedIn Profile, for instance, Assisting German finance corporations, and law firms communicate in Mexican.

Alternatively, you can pick strong keywords such as German into Mexican Translator. It is essential to fill out as many profile fields as you can. They should include links to your blog or website.

A complete profile depicts the perception of an expert. Thoroughly proofread your work before publishing your profile

Search

Search for colleagues, prospects, and contacts to connect with and then save the search. This will enable you to get notifications on others who fit your search reference. There is a new Pro Finder tool that brings on board independent translators.

Follow 

Follow prospective translation professionals to keep yourself updated on changes and new information. It is also possible to follow people in groups without necessarily following them.

Being Involved

For you to land clients on LinkedIn, become heavily invested in some few useful groups. Ask and respond to questions. Share your resources. Start conversations.

Join the groups with the aim of starting conversations with people who are likely to be beneficiaries of your services. Do reviews of target profiles to know which groups that you can participate in.

Analyze group participants that could be prospective peers and clients and find ways to connect with them. Also, provide value by being a regular contributor to relevant discussions with no expectations of instant feedback.

Any time you find the relevant people to connect with, take some time to write a very professional but good personal invitation to connect.

Recommendations

LinkedIn has another interesting feature. People can publish endorsements about your work. It is a great way to demonstrate to clients that you are worthy. Do not shy away from asking for a good recommendation for a client or a colleague, especially if you are confident you did a fantastic job for them.

It is also good to note that as a freelance, you heavily peg on positive testimonial and feedback to grow your brand and business. Also, indicate that you liked working with that client and you would be glad to give a good recommendation for the client taking their time.

Status Updates

Regularly make status updates that will appear on the homepage feeds of the people that are connected to you. Ensure that the posts you make are very professional and are related to work.

It is perfectly in order and respectable to create a personality through creativity and credibility. Share links to interesting articles that may be relevant to people you have connected with. You can also share projects you are working as long as it is agreeable with your client. You can also repost updates by your connections to give them more publicity.

Post on Pulse which is the main source of news on LinkedIn. A list of your articles will assist clients to rate your demonstrable skills.

Conclusively. LinkedIn has very many opportunities for freelance translators. You only need to spare time to maximize the usage of the platform.

4 Questions to Ask Translators before Hiring Them

If you’re in need of a translator for your business, you should probably take the time you need to make sure that you are hiring the best professional for the job. There are many things that you should take into consideration before taking the final decision and actually hiring the person, but if you’re new in this you might not know what you should look out for.

When you are interviewing a potential employee for a translation position, there are some things that you can ask them which will help you decide if they are the right choice for your company. Here are a few questions you should always ask a translator before hiring them.

  1. What is your native language?

While this might be one of the things that many people consider something that is essential for every translator, you won’t easily find translators who are native in more than one language. This happens because many professional translators have learnt their second language either while they were in school or during their university years.

The ones who are native are less likely to seek independent work and usually prefer to join various translation companies as they believe that without a degree, their skills will be put to better use there. In any case, it would still be best for you to work with a bilingual native speaker as they will be able to translate all the native phrases and words in order for them to make perfect sense to the native speakers.

  1. What language do you think in?

While a translator might be perfectly fluent in one language, they will definitely have a mother language in which they will be most likely be thinking in. While that is perfectly normal and understandable, this might not benefit your blog or your creative articles in the long run.

A person who thinks in their mother tongue will find it a lot more difficult to stick to translating native words and phrases accurately and they might make simple mistakes which will be noticeable by the natives. It would be best if your translator thinks in the language they are trying to translate in as they will make the least amount of mistakes.

  1. Have you worked in this industry before?

If your company is running a blog for a particular niche and you wish to find a translator who will be able to keep up with difficult types of texts and technical terms such as medical terms and vocabulary, you should probably not forget to check if your potential employee has worked in this field before.

Even though the translator might be an experienced one, you should make sure that they have experience in your particular field as this will not only help them produce good quality translations but they will also be able to get the job done a lot quicker and more efficiently.

  1. Would you be able to start working right away?

This is a question that can truly help you see in a translator is actually experienced and knows what he’s doing. The only answer you should be expecting at this point is for them to want to take a look at the proposed text and let you know.

A translator who is experienced will know that there are quite a few things to take into consideration before accepting a job, like the complexity of the text and the amount of technical terms in it. You would be better off working with a person who knows what they should look into before accepting a job.

Finding the right professional for your business

Hiring a translator can be difficult if you don’t know exactly what you’re looking for. If your business is still new and you’re still experimenting with promoting your content to other markets abroad, you won’t have to be looking for strict professionals and you could definitely start working with a translator with a lower rate who probably has less experience.

The more expanded your business is and the more difficult the niche, you will have to keep in mind that working with a professional translator will not only help you make the content that you translate more appealing to the local markets, but you will also be able to keep your content looking professional, free of simple mistakes and as appealing to your customers as possible. The questions mentioned in this article will help you get a better sense of the person you are intending to hire and help you make that final decision.

Tips for Surviving Your First Mistake in a Translation Agency

Nobody is perfect – and at some point, everyone will make a mistake. The only question is “when?” Even professionals are not safe – but the thing about mistakes is that they help you learn. It’s important that you accept these mistakes, take responsibility for them – and use them as a stepping stone towards being a more successful person.

Still, there’s more than saying “I’m sorry, moving on” behind such a mistake. In order to protect your job as a translator in a certain agency, there are certain steps that you need to follow. This guide will help you through your first mistake so that you can be safe, learn from it, and then move on.

  • Letting the Client Know Right Away

Some people prefer going by the “If I don’t say anything, maybe they won’t notice” method. If you’re lucky and no one notices, then you’ve lucked out; you just have to be careful that it never happens again.

However, this may also go the other way, with the client finding out by themselves – or from other sources – that there is an error in the text you have translated for them. The next step would be them coming at your agency, roaring thunders and lightning, threatening they are going to sue.

To prevent this from happening, you might want to take some initiative. If by any chance you realize the mistake before the client does, do not hope for a miracle and pretend the mistake does not exist. Instead, make sure that you contact the customer right away, giving them notice (hopefully) before they use those documents.

If you do this, the client will also hopefully see that you are an honest person – one who places the interests of the client over their own.

There’s no guarantee that you won’t have to suffer from this mistake – but taking this initiative might just soften the blow. This way, you might get away with just a warning instead of being fired.

  • Explain Yourself – Not Excuse Yourself

There’s a very big difference between explaining what happened and making excuses for yourself. People choose translation agencies over freelancers for this exact reason – simply because they expect transparency at all points.

A client is more willing to trust an honest translator that brings all cards to the table rather than one that seems picture perfect – but also seems to be hiding something. Most people have an eye for these kinds of people.

Start by explaining why this mistake happened – but don’t make it sound like you are looking for excuses. If you’re trying to put all the blame on external factors, this might not sit well with the customer.

Instead, put your hands up (in a manner of speaking), admit it was your mistake, but also make them see that you learned from it. Show them that you can move forward with this mistake and use it as a stepping stone.

How well this explanation will be accepted, it will all depend on the severity of the mistake. Obviously, if you compromised the work of your client, it’s clear that they might have a bone to pick with you afterward.

However, if you do manage to show them that you’ve learned from your mistake, they will obviously appreciate your honesty. This way, there’s a high chance that this client will use your agency again in the future.

  • Offer to Fix Things

You’re working for a translation agency now, so your mistake is the entire company’s mistake. Unless you “clean” the black spot on the image, it will stay dirty and compromise the reputation of the company.

Obviously, this does not only mean that you have to fix the text you messed up. You will actually be expected to do that, considering they paid your agency to get the correct text.

Instead of just fixing things on the spot, you might also want to fix them on the long run; fix the relationship, not just the text. If the customer is still not happy, offer them a discount for their next order – or even throw some freebies in the mix.

Offering your services completely free of charge might not be the ideal scenario for you; however, if you risk losing a potential customer, it might save you hassle and money in the long run.

Instead of thinking of it as wasted time, think of it as an investment for the future. If the client leaves unhappily, then there’s no way they’ll be using your agency again. Furthermore, there is also a high chance that word will spread, placing a big dirty spot on the company. You don’t want a mistake like this to hit the breaks on your career.

Final Thoughts

Mistakes are always bound to happen; that’s how we actually learn and become better about our job. But remember that every mistake you make will reflect on the agency that you are working for.

If you follow these tips, you may be able to prevent a small mistake from growing into a full-blown disaster.