6 Ways to Properly Collaborate with Your Translator

Translation is a two-way process. Indeed, most of it falls on the translator – who has to provide the actual translation of the text. However, there are certain things that have to be respected by the client as well. In this domain, collaboration is key if you want the final product to be of the highest quality.

Still, sometimes, collaborating with your translator can be rather difficult – particularly if you are a first-time client. Those who are new to translation might not understand how the process works – and how important the role of the client is.

Regardless if you are collaborating with an independent translator or an agency, here are some tips to make sure the final result is a success.

  1. Submit the Correct and Final Documentation

When a translator receives a text, that text generally goes through a certain process: first translation by the actual translator, followed by the proofreading and editing by the editor. This is to ensure that the final product is top quality.

Now imagine what would happen if you gave a document to your translator, and right before the deadline, you show up with additional changes to the text. An “Oops, can you add this too?” might not make things very easy for your translator – mainly because they would have to start the process all over again. This will take time – which they would normally put to better use on another task.

Plus, these changes will not be good for you either. By coming with last-minute changes, you’ll be extending your deadline – which will not help you at all if you need those papers fast.

Sending the final version of the documentation is the most important part of collaborating with your translator. It will ensure that everything goes smoothly, without any delays.

  1. Understand the Costs

When it comes to translations, the costs are based on the document word count along with the time it takes to do a certain task. This means that things such as last0-minute edits or design changes are not covered by the initial costs.

As mentioned in the point above, each of these changes takes extra time – and we all know that time is money. When you come up with additional demands, you have to be prepared for extra charges.

To avoid these extra costs, you may want to provide the correct documentation from the very beginning. Furthermore, if you have questions about the whole process and its costs, do your best to address them from the very beginning. This will prevent any surprises from coming along the way.

  1. Be Active in the Translation Process

The translator may be familiar with the topic at hand, but the client will always know their product best. Make sure that you are always available to answer any potential questions your translator has. If you do this, not only will the process go smoothly without any delays, but it will also ensure that the final product is of the highest quality.

  1. Provide Reference Material

As part of collaborating with your translator, you need to ensure that they have everything they need to provide a high-quality document. Many clients seem to think that translators are gods that know everything by heart – but some brands may have a specific terminology that a translator may not know about.

Therefore, if you have glossaries and reference materials, do not hold it for yourself. By all means, share it with them. They will definitely appreciate it and use it to create the perfect translation.

  1. Respect the Set Deadline

Whenever a translator receives a document and a deadline, they work their schedule to properly work on your paper while also dealing with other tasks. This schedule involves time for proper writing, time for researching – and every respectable translator will allocate a certain time per day to work on your paper before sending it to editing.

This means that if you go ahead and change the deadline, asking for it to be delivered sooner, you will disrupt the entire process. Indeed, the project manager will do their best to deliver your document when you want it – but you have to be aware that you’ll be rushing it and putting stress on the team.

Since you’ll be cutting from their time, the quality of the final result may be compromised.

  1. Provide Feedback

Never underestimate the power of feedback – regardless if it’s positive or negative. This will help the translator properly understand the needs of their clients – and also improve their skill if there’s something that needs particular attention.

Final Thoughts

Translation is, in every way possible, a collaboration between the client and the translation agency. By working together, you will ensure that the final product is of the highest quality, without any “surprises” along the way.

During and after the translation

“Most translators are not looking for glory. […] They simply want the ability to do the best job they can. They want to be proud of the difficult work they do. Giving them a closer relationship with the buyer facilitates that.”
– Nataly Kelly, Common Sense Advisory

This post is the continuation of what was discussed in “Resources and planning” and “The file to be translated.” If you haven’t read those, I’d suggest you start from there. The aim of this series of posts is to give you hints on how to achieve the best results by doing what you can to help the translator do his/her job faster and with greater accuracy. Below are some recommended actions you should take during the translation process itself and afterwards.

  • Respond to your translator’s questions

An inquiring mind usually makes a good language professional. Competent translators and revisers practically “dissect” the text throughout the project. As a result, more often than not they run into inconsistencies, ambiguities, cloudy areas, and the like. Their best shot at solving these puzzles is through the author, who supposedly knows everything the text intends to communicate. So, if you’re the author or have contact with him/her, you’d do well to let the translators know from the start that you can be contacted for clarification.

Here comes the most important piece of advice in this regard: make sure you or your team replies to the translator’s inquiries in a timely manner. Keep in mind that schedules are usually tight and that any unclear word or sentence might interfere in the understanding of the whole message. Sometimes a translator gets stuck and is only able to go on after that bit is clarified. So by responding to your translator’s questions right away, you can avoid delaying the process even more, which is of course in your own best interest. 

  • Send feedback and the revised version of a translation

Now suppose the project is done: you got your translation, read it, started using it… this is the end of your interaction with the language professional (at least until the next project), right? Not quite, unless you intend to use a new service provider every time you need a translation.

Nobody wants to be changing or correcting the same thing time and again. So, if you have someone in your team capable of revising the translation well, have this person go through the translated text (as I said in a previous post, this is a tricky situation I will discuss in the near future). Ideally use a word processor’s track change tool or highlight any alterations. Then make sure to send the revised version to your translator. An experienced professional will know how to analyze the modifications critically and incorporate the preferred styles, terms, words, expressions, or phrases into future texts.

Let’s not forget that most translators today work with translation memory tools (to have an idea of what this is, refer to my last post). Another advantage of this technology is the incorporated search tool: the professional can easily retrieve previously translated content to see how s/he translated words, terms or expressions and the context in which they were used. Needless to say, consistency is a key element in any well-written text and also among different texts of the same company. CAT tools can guarantee 100% consistency if handled appropriately by the translator and updated according to your revisions.

Since healthy relationships involve the exchange of constructive criticism, don’t be afraid of talking about mistakes with your service provider. Conversely, if your translator did an awesome job, go ahead and tell him/her. Committed professionals will be pleased to hear they’re on the right track and will always try to do better.

I started out intending to write a single post about this topic and ended up with a series of three (so far). This is a hint of how much there is to discuss about actions you might take in this regard. Interestingly, in writing these initial posts, I realized that a great deal of this blog will have to do with giving you the right tools to get the most for your money by collaborating with your translator.

I recognize that clients sometimes have no control over some situations. It’s enough that you might now be more aware of the best-case scenario and of the benefits you can get in return. If you decide to follow these recommendations the next time you get the chance, feel free to share the results with us.

The file to be translated

In my last post I started giving translation buyers tips on how to collaborate with a translator for their own interest. Below are some other actions you can benefit from.

  • Send the final version of a text

Make every effort to ensure that the text you send for translation is the final, revised version. If that’s not possible, the least you can do is to highlight any last-minute changes or make them visible by using a word processor tool that tracks changes made. Expect to be charged accordingly and, depending on how much of the text has been altered, to renegotiate the deadline.

What you definitely should avoid is an endless back-and-forth of emails with various versions of the same text, especially after the translator has started his/her job—this is the perfect recipe for wasting time and, most likely, wasting money.

  • Send editable files

Translators translate. Simple, right? Yet, some people think they can send a translator an image and have it back with everything exactly the same, except for the language. Well, it’s totally feasible, but this is another service your translator can offer you—and not all translators do. Some of us love desktop publishing and have a great time formatting texts, making charts, preparing tables, creating images… whereas others aren’t very good at it, don’t like it, or simply think it’s not worth the time it takes them. They’d rather focus on what they do best: translations.

Most translators will ask you for an editable file. That said, editable PDFs are OK but not ideal. Sometimes it’s also possible to copy the content from a given file and paste it into a word-processor file, but some of the formatting might be lost. This happens especially when the document has other than plain text.

The best file format can not only be edited, but is also supported by the computer-assisted translation tools (CAT tools) that your service provider uses. Now a brief parenthesis is crucial here: CAT tools and, more specifically, translation memory software, are NOT the same as machine translation tools (more on these two subjects in the future). In a nutshell, a translation memory is a file that stores the sentences/segments translated by the user. So if your translator comes across the same or similar content, the software offers a prompt of whatever s/he has written in previous texts, helping to maintain consistency. One of the advantages of such tools is that the formatting is usually left untouched.

In cases when you don’t have an editable file, reactions will vary from translator to translator. You might be asked to send the material to a professional who can transform it into an editable text before the translator does his/her job. The translator might choose to type the translated text into a word-processor file, and you’ll be responsible for the final formatting. Alternatively, the translator might offer to do the formatting for you (and charge accordingly) or refer you to a colleague who can do this task.

The perfect way to end this part of the discussion is by using an excerpt from the January 2007 section “Business Smarts” of the ATA Chronicle (a journal of the American Translators Association), entitled “Working with PDFs”:

“Some colleagues have established a fixed surcharge for working from hardcopy and PDF documents to compensate for the extra formatting requirements and the difficulty of using computer-assisted translation tools. In many cases, even direct clients will provide an editable copy of documents […] if they are informed that translating a PDF document takes longer and therefore costs more.”

As this article shows, it’s also a matter of reducing the margin for error:

“They [translation buyers] may also be pleased to learn that a translator working from native word-processor files can offer better quality and accuracy, since elements such as tables and lists do not need to be laboriously (and possibly inaccurately) re-typed.”

It should be clear by now that collaborating with your translator is not only about making his/her life easier. Most importantly, it’s about doing what you can to get the best possible end product.

On a lighter note…

By Alejandro Moreno-Ramos