Tenets of Building an Online Translation Portfolio to Gain Traction

An online translation portfolio is a document that comprises a selection of texts that have been translated professionally and some of the best examples of what possible clients should anticipate if they choose to give you work. Often, clients will ask for some sample text translation before they hire you. A portfolio is useful for deciding if you are the best person for the job.

The online portfolio will showcase your skills, expertise, and areas of expertise. There are some guidelines on the portfolio ought to look like and the things it should contain.

Content

A portfolio should contain texts that are extremely narrow and highly specialized. These texts will promote your skillfulness in the best way possible. The translations ought to create emphasis on specialization, and they should be those translations that are among your best.

It is advisable not to mix different specialties in a single portfolio. You make a couple of them which should be particularized for each of your areas of expertise.

You should make sure that you strictly adhere to the copyright laws. In circumstances where the translated texts have the Creative Commons protection license, the right attribution to the author of the text should be done. It should include asking permission after contacting the author.

Formatting

Text samples on your portfolio should be interesting, legible and short. Only use professional looking fonts, standard font size and color, no photos or clip art or emoticons on your translator portfolio.

Potential clients are only supposed to focus on your translation skills. Target and source text are supposed to be side by side, preferably on a similar page. All links in the documents should be okay. Having broken links on your portfolio is unprofessional.

Sharing

There needs to be a link to your portfolio on your resume or your cover letter. One should equally send it to every potential that is in contact with you and should be available for download on your site, assuming you have one. A link to your translator’s portfolio should be on all online translator marketplaces where you have a profile. It should also be on other freelancer networks. Sharing your portfolio on social networks such as Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and LinkedIn could easily land you more clients.

How to Draw Traffic to Your Portfolio

To get the attention of more potential clients you out the portfolio on social networks. The portfolio requires to be updated on a regular basis. Every update is then shared with your target audience.

You can also share your portfolio on your company’s website. The site should be well – designed, should have high-quality content, should be fresh and should be SEO optimized. When your website is on the first pages of Google search, it will lead to an increase in the number of potential clients who will visit your portfolio and then give you work.

Other Contents on Your Portfolio

 A catchy portfolio should have all essential personal information. Translators with more experience and have developed their own translation companies place their company logo in the document. Translator’s comments are also critical to possible clients as they usually showcase your working methods. These translations typically come after every small translation and have few lines about every translation and a few select techniques that you employed to ensure the task was done.

Type of Client

Your portfolio is likely to gain traction if targets high –end translation clients.  From lists of clients, pick those with more significant influence in their field and then choose relevant samples.

Text Complexity

Include texts that have special terms and specifics of culture on your portfolio. It shows what you know and depicts your capacity to handle difficult translation tasks. Also, identify characteristics for sample selection depending on your choices.

In summary, a good portfolio is an introductory tool for demonstrating skills, and it is highly recommended that every translator has one.

Using LinkedIn to Find a Pool of Clients for Your Translation Services

LinkedIn is one of the most crucial social media tools for freelance translators who are looking to advance and broaden their clientele. LinkedIn is like your online curriculum vitae. It has the capacity to do a lot more than that. It is your online footprint that serves to brand your reputation, and it is the same platform that you can use to exhibit the value you can bring to clients. There are so many networking opportunities and clients that are present every day on LinkedIn, and they are freely accessible.

I want to share tips on how to maximize your LinkedIn experience.

Update Your Profile

Fill up your contact information, education history, professional experience and the other vital fields.  Include a professional – looking profile picture. It should be a headshot with a friendly smile, Avoid using your company logo in place of a portrait. Potential clients want to visualize the person behind the translation business.

Come up with a very catchy title for your LinkedIn Profile, for instance, Assisting German finance corporations, and law firms communicate in Mexican.

Alternatively, you can pick strong keywords such as German into Mexican Translator. It is essential to fill out as many profile fields as you can. They should include links to your blog or website.

A complete profile depicts the perception of an expert. Thoroughly proofread your work before publishing your profile

Search

Search for colleagues, prospects, and contacts to connect with and then save the search. This will enable you to get notifications on others who fit your search reference. There is a new Pro Finder tool that brings on board independent translators.

Follow 

Follow prospective translation professionals to keep yourself updated on changes and new information. It is also possible to follow people in groups without necessarily following them.

Being Involved

For you to land clients on LinkedIn, become heavily invested in some few useful groups. Ask and respond to questions. Share your resources. Start conversations.

Join the groups with the aim of starting conversations with people who are likely to be beneficiaries of your services. Do reviews of target profiles to know which groups that you can participate in.

Analyze group participants that could be prospective peers and clients and find ways to connect with them. Also, provide value by being a regular contributor to relevant discussions with no expectations of instant feedback.

Any time you find the relevant people to connect with, take some time to write a very professional but good personal invitation to connect.

Recommendations

LinkedIn has another interesting feature. People can publish endorsements about your work. It is a great way to demonstrate to clients that you are worthy. Do not shy away from asking for a good recommendation for a client or a colleague, especially if you are confident you did a fantastic job for them.

It is also good to note that as a freelance, you heavily peg on positive testimonial and feedback to grow your brand and business. Also, indicate that you liked working with that client and you would be glad to give a good recommendation for the client taking their time.

Status Updates

Regularly make status updates that will appear on the homepage feeds of the people that are connected to you. Ensure that the posts you make are very professional and are related to work.

It is perfectly in order and respectable to create a personality through creativity and credibility. Share links to interesting articles that may be relevant to people you have connected with. You can also share projects you are working as long as it is agreeable with your client. You can also repost updates by your connections to give them more publicity.

Post on Pulse which is the main source of news on LinkedIn. A list of your articles will assist clients to rate your demonstrable skills.

Conclusively. LinkedIn has very many opportunities for freelance translators. You only need to spare time to maximize the usage of the platform.

7 Reasons Why a Specialized Translation Career Makes Sense

Becoming a professional translator is all about loving what your job. If you don’t like Japanese, Italian or German (for example), you are likely to burn out and look for an alternative career down the line.

However, one of the more exciting prospects of being a professional translator is the ability to specialize in a certain field. You can choose a number of fields and translation types that will make you unique among your colleagues. Let’s take a look at several examples of careers that you may want to consider:

  • Medical translation in Spanish language
  • Technical document translation in Chinese language
  • Copywriting with translation and localization for German and Scandinavian languages

The list goes on and on without any signs of stopping. This means that the prospect of being “a translator” isn’t as simple or straightforward as many people assume. With that said, I’m about to list several reasons as to why a specialized translation career makes sense both from a personal and a professional standpoint.

  • Clear career path

Seeing that you specialized in civil engineering translation or legal document translation means that you know where your career is headed. You can easily identify seminars, conferences and meet ups that are relevant to your work.

This is a benefit that general translators generally (pun intended) don’t have access to. Having a clear career development path based on your choice of translation niche will save you a lot of time and energy – not to mention the added points and references in your resume.

  • Higher pricing range

Being a specialized translator with access to resources and knowledge unbeknownst to other translators makes you special in the clients’ eyes. You are solely capable of translating that difficult legal document into Greek (for example) like no other translator out there.

You can safely bump up your prices and make much more money than before. It goes without saying that the quality of your work should (and will) reflect the price point you set out to achieve. After all, you are a professional in your niche.

  • Establishing niche authority

Niches owe their name to an Italian renaissance architectural ideology in which separate art guilds had separate spaces to show off their work in public places. This means that every “niche” had a unique work of art displayed for everyone to see. As it turns out, the logic applies to professional translation as perfectly as it did in the 16th century.

Once you establish yourself as a reliable, capable and willing professional in a narrow translation niche – the work will come by itself. Word spreads around very quickly in small industries with only a few stakeholders (who more than likely cooperate on some level). In practice this means that you will always have a source of work in some form or another because just like your clients, you are a niche professional yourself.

  • Shorter turnaround times

Professional translators who specialize in certain areas will most likely run into clients that know exactly what they need. This is one of the most important benefits of opting for a specialized translation career path rather than keeping things general.

Clients that work in small niches usually know what, why and how they want their translation or localization to look like. They are also much easier to work with since you will already be familiar with the industry and the terminology required towards getting the job done successfully. If working in a slightly less stressful environment means something for you as a person, this one should definitely be taken into account.

  • Well-informed audience

Lastly, the audience involved in consuming your translation will more than likely consist of industry professionals as well. For example, translating medical, legal or technical documents into different languages means that they are meant for trained eyes. This means that you can look forward to understanding, well-informed and patient readers that look forward to reading your texts.

It’s also quite possible to receive critical and positive feedback about your work for the betterment of your professional experience as a result. If the audience you write for means something to you as a translator, opting for a specialized career route might just be the best solution for you.

Making sense of it all (Conclusion)

It’s easy to tell someone else that a life choice “makes sense” – after all, your choices will reflect your career moving forward. Translators who are not excited about their jobs anymore or feel that the process is getting stale need to change things up.

Specializing in a certain translation area doesn’t mean that you are shutting yourself off from the rest of the translation community. Taking on regular work on the side is still a viable choice from time to time, however specialized you may be.